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IRS & Tax Information

IRS Collection Due Process

May 12th, 2017

Posted in IRS & Tax Information

Taxpayers should know that the IRS cannot typically levy your assets without first giving you notice.  There are a few exceptions to this general rule, however.  For instance, the IRS may levy without prior notice if it feels collection of the tax is in jeopardy or when the IRS levies a state tax refund.  Absent an exception, the IRS will typically provide a formal Notice of Intent to Levy prior to levying any of a taxpayer’s assets.
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Florida Sales Tax on Transient Rentals

February 17th, 2017

Posted in Business Law,IRS & Tax Information

Transient rentals are a thriving business in Florida, and one which many Florida real estate owners may utilize in an attempt to supplement their income.  Generally speaking, a transient rental is one that lasts for less than six (6) months.  What many property owners do not know is that transient rentals are subject to Florida sales tax.  Florida law requires that property owners charge to, and collect from, each transient guest an additional six percent (6%).
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Important Deadlines for Taxpayers in 2017

December 22nd, 2016

Posted in IRS & Tax Information

Calendaring important IRS and tax authority deadlines can save you a lot of headaches at tax time.  To avoid paying penalties and other tax consequences, keep a calendar and plan for tax deadlines with your Accountant, CPA, Enrolled Agent, or Tax Attorney.  Jackson Law Group has tax attorneys that can assist you with IRS or other tax problems.  The below items are a few examples of important dates that may vary based on individual circumstances:
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Understanding Self-Employment Tax (What is it and Who Must Pay it)

December 2nd, 2016

Posted in Business Law,IRS & Tax Information

If you are a Florida small business owner, independent contractor, or otherwise self-employed, it’s important to note that you may be liable for self-employment taxes.  Generally, the term self-employment tax refers to the Social Security and Medicare taxes for taxpayers who are self-employed.  Self-employed individual should calculate and report your self-employment tax on Schedule SE of their form 1040.
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St. Johns County Local Business Tax

September 30th, 2016

Posted in Business Law,General Practice,IRS & Tax Information

When the State of Florida turned St. Johns County over to local government in 1972, the county elected to collect local business taxes (formerly known as occupational licenses). The local business tax, County Ordinance 72-2, requires all individuals or organizations doing business located in or operating in St. Johns County to obtain a local business tax receipt. The tax is paid annually with the fiscal year beginning on October 1.
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Delinquent Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts

September 2nd, 2016

Posted in IRS & Tax Information

Taxpayers are required to file a Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts (“FBAR”) to report any financial interest the taxpayer holds in a foreign financial account.  The FBAR filing requirement applies to taxpayers that have signature authority over a foreign financial account.  Foreign financial accounts include, but are not necessarily limited to, bank accounts, brokerage accounts, mutual funds, and trusts. 
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Florida Property Taxes – You Must Act Soon If You Wish to Contest Your County’s Proposed Assessments

August 24th, 2016

Posted in IRS & Tax Information,Real Estate Law

The Firm is republishing an August 2015 blog post regarding the ability of Florida property owners to contest or appeal the assessed value of their property.  The republished blog, below, includes updated information for 2016.
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Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act

June 24th, 2016

Posted in IRS & Tax Information,Real Estate Law

The Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act (“MFDRA”) prevents homeowners who went through a short sale, foreclosure sale, a principal reduction, or otherwise received a waiver of a mortgage debt regarding their primary residence from being taxed on the amount of mortgage debt cancelled or forgiven.  Many homeowners have used the MFDRA in prior years to prevent large tax liabilities.
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