Blog

Asset Protection

New Funding to Protect Florida’s Elderly Population

March 17th, 2017

Posted in Asset Protection,Estate & Personal Planning

Many of Florida’s senior citizens and families have reason to celebrate the 2017-2018 Annual Budget, which recommends $315.5 million for the Florida Department of Elder Affairs.
Continue Reading »

Share Button

Tax Rules for Surviving Spouses on Primary Residences

July 25th, 2016

Posted in Asset Protection,Estate & Personal Planning,Real Estate Law

Understanding the tax rules as a widow or surviving spouse can help you project the real tax cost of selling your primary residence. Below are just a few general things to consider in making the tax analysis.
Continue Reading »

Share Button

Importance of a Durable Power of Attorney

May 27th, 2016

Posted in Asset Protection,Estate & Personal Planning,General Practice

While we are happy to assist clients with creating wills to ensure assets are distributed according to clients’ wishes at their death, we offer a much broader service to clients.  In addition to revocable trusts which can allow for control over assets titled in the name of the trust during lifetime, one of the most important documents that we draft for clients is a durable power of attorney.
Continue Reading »

Share Button

Do I Need to Write “Trustee”, “Attorney-in-Fact”, or “POA” after My Signature on Documents?

November 4th, 2015

Posted in Asset Protection,Estate & Personal Planning,General Practice

When you act as a trustee under a Trust or as an attorney-in-fact or POA under a Durable Power of Attorney, you are doing so as a fiduciary and under a legal role where you have certain legal authority. The above question could apply to any documents you sign such as a mortgage, promissory note, contract, or check. The short answer to the above question is – no, you do not need to. However, you may want to (depending on the type of document), and it may better practice to do so. Moreover, what the document actually says may control despite however you may sign.
Continue Reading »

Share Button

Protecting Florida Tenants After Foreclosure

October 21st, 2015

Posted in Asset Protection,Condominium & Homeowner Association Law,Real Estate Law

Previously, the federal Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act of 2009 (“PTAF”) provided some protection to Florida tenants leasing property in foreclosure. Subject to certain exceptions, the PTAF mandated that purchasers at a foreclosure sale take title to the property subject to the rights of a bona fide tenant. It also required the purchaser comply with certain notice requirements prior to terminating a lease. Unfortunately, the PTAF expired on December 31, 2014, potentially leaving Florida tenants unprotected. Thus, Florida legislatures enacted Section 83.561 of the Florida Statutes to help fill the void left by the expiration of the PTAF.
Continue Reading »

Share Button

Florida Property Taxes – You Must Act Soon If You Wish to Contest Your County’s Proposed Assessments

August 24th, 2015

Posted in Asset Protection,General Practice,IRS & Tax Information,Real Estate Law

The Firm is republishing a September 2014 blog post regarding the ability of Florida property owners to contest or appeal the assessed value of their property.  The republished blog, below, includes updated information for 2015.
Continue Reading »

Share Button

Medicaid and Nursing Homes: A Quick Guide to the Rules

August 18th, 2015

Posted in Asset Protection,Estate & Personal Planning

Medicaid has been around for many years, as it was designed to help low income people with healthcare. In today’s society, many people use Medicaid as their long-term care insurance and it pays for the majority of nursing home care for patients across the United States.
Continue Reading »

Share Button

Joint Tenants with Rights of Survivorship – What it Means and Pitfalls to Consider

June 26th, 2015

Posted in Asset Protection,Estate & Personal Planning,General Practice,Real Estate Law

Joint Tenancy with Right of Survivorship (JTWROS) is a form of joint property ownership available to two or more people and characterized by the right of survivorship. Upon one tenant’s death, the share of the property passes to the surviving co-tenants. There are five requirements for creation of a JTWROS: the right of survivorship and the four unities of possession, interest, title, and time.
Continue Reading »

Share Button